Tried to get a nice photo of Isis to show off her tominal tooth while we were working yesterday. It didn’t quite come out, but she was absolutely set on misbehaving.
This is one of the synapomorphies used to distinguish falcons from hawks. The tooth is actually the little notch and protrusion you see at the tip of her beak. Falcons tend not have the foot strength of the larger, bulkier birds of prey, and, as such, have evolved a more effective means of killing their prey. They use the incredible speed of their stoop (clocked at about 200mph) to knock their prey out of the air, follow it down to the ground, and then sever the spinal cord with their fancy little tooth.
And just in case you haven’t had enough of a lesson in bird anatomy, let’s talk about her nares! If you can imagine, the incredible speed at which a peregrine dives for their food can cause serious strain on their respiratory system. But the bony cones in the center of her nostrils, called tubercles, act to slow down the air entering the body, allowing the bird to breathe when the air pressure would otherwise make it impossible. Jet engines employ a similar structure, for a similar purpose.
Also, look how pretty she is!

Tried to get a nice photo of Isis to show off her tominal tooth while we were working yesterday. It didn’t quite come out, but she was absolutely set on misbehaving.

This is one of the synapomorphies used to distinguish falcons from hawks. The tooth is actually the little notch and protrusion you see at the tip of her beak. Falcons tend not have the foot strength of the larger, bulkier birds of prey, and, as such, have evolved a more effective means of killing their prey. They use the incredible speed of their stoop (clocked at about 200mph) to knock their prey out of the air, follow it down to the ground, and then sever the spinal cord with their fancy little tooth.

And just in case you haven’t had enough of a lesson in bird anatomy, let’s talk about her nares! If you can imagine, the incredible speed at which a peregrine dives for their food can cause serious strain on their respiratory system. But the bony cones in the center of her nostrils, called tubercles, act to slow down the air entering the body, allowing the bird to breathe when the air pressure would otherwise make it impossible. Jet engines employ a similar structure, for a similar purpose.

Also, look how pretty she is!

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    People wonder why Peregrines are one of my all time favourite animals.
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